New Entries

  • "Mr. Frederick B. Smith, artist, author and actor, has disposed of a lot at the corner of Broadway and Eleventh [Hooper] street, to Mr. Thomas Bell, the grocer. He has engaged Messrs. Quinn & Reilly to to erect a four story store and dwelling, twenty-five by fifty feet. The plans and specifications are from the pen of Mr. John Clyde"1

    Appears to refer to building at 403 Broadway, northeast corner of Hooper Street.

  • [John Clyde] is engaged for the construction of eight three story Philadelphia front stores and dwellings on Grand street, near Leonard, for Mr. Douglas. The frontage on Grand street is 180 feet and the depth 50 feet each."1

  • The history of St. Peter Claver parish dates to 1915, the year that the Catholic Colored Club (CCC) was founded by Jules DeWeever.  The Club was formed with the express purpose of having a “Church for Colored Catholics established in this [Brooklyn] Diocese.”  Coincidentally, at about the same time, in 1916 Bishop McDonnell of Brooklyn called for the establishment of “Home Missions” to meet the needs of the heterogenous Catholic population of the Diocese.  Rev. Bernard Quinn responded to the Bishop’s call by proposing the establishment of a church for African Americans, and volunteered to work on this "Colored Mission" for the Diocese.

  • Previously known as the Ormond Place Church. Constructed in 1853 for Bedford Reformed Church. After a dispute with the Reformed Church led that congregation to abandon the project, the Central Congregational Church became first tenant. 

  • Opened on October 14, 1901 as a vaudeville theater. The original theater had a seating capacity of 2,170. William Fox took the theater over in 1909, showing movies and vaudeville shows. The building was demolished in 1949.

  • The Domino Sugar Refinery is one of the most prominent industrial sites on the East River waterfront. The complex consists of seven larger buildings and many other smaller structures, occupying a six-block site on the Williamsburg waterfront immediately north of the Williamsburg Bridge. The existing complex includes two buildings from the refinery’s earliest period of construction, 1884, as well as a number of other significant structures from the 1920s-1930s and 1950s-1960s.

  • Theodore A. Havemeyer (May 17, 1839 – April 26, 1897) and his brother, Henry O. Havemeyer, transformed the family sugar refining operation into the Sugar Trust. The brothers were the sons of Frederick C. Havemeyer, Jr. and grandsons of Frederick C. Havemeyer, one of the founding partners of the Havemeyer sugar empire. Theodore oversaw the operations of the refineries and was responsible for the design of the Havemyers & Elder Sugar Refinery (1884) in Williamsburgh.

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